In the News

Press Coverage on Our Research Results:

Results from my group are regularly featured in online and printed media, as well as on TV. Below are some examples for press coverage on our work.


Imaging Discovery of a Wide-Orbit Jovian Planet in a Triple System

July 7, 2016

This artist's impression shows a view of the triple star system HD 131399 from close to the giant planet orbiting in the system. The planet is known as HD 131399Ab and appears at the lower-left of the picture. Located about 320 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur), HD 131399Ab is about 16 million years old, making it also one of the youngest exoplanets discovered to date, and one of very few directly-imaged planets. With a temperature of around 580 degrees Celsius and having an estimated mass of four Jupiter masses, it is also one of the coldest and least massive directly-imaged exoplanets.

This artist’s impression shows a view of the triple star system HD 131399 from close to the giant planet orbiting in the system. The planet is known as HD 131399Ab and appears at the lower-left of the picture. Located about 320 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur), HD 131399Ab is about 16 million years old, making it also one of the youngest exoplanets discovered to date, and one of very few directly-imaged planets. With a temperature of around 580 degrees Celsius and having an estimated mass of four Jupiter masses, it is also one of the coldest and least massive directly-imaged exoplanets.

UA Press Release and ESO Press Release

This discovery was reported widely, including: CNNThe GuardianHistory ChannelNational GeographicSpiegelNew York TimesWashington PostArizona Daily StarUSA TodayForbesHuffington PostUA News,


Spiral Arms Discovered in Planet-forming Disk

A two-armed spiral discovered in a planet-forming disk.

A two-armed spiral discovered in a planet-forming disk.

October 9, 2015

According to a new paper co-authored by UA researchers, an ultra-rare spiral structure lives inside a planet-forming disk, some 400 light-years from here.


NASA’s NExSS Coalition to Lead Search for Life on Distant Worlds

April 21, 2015

New NExSS ProgramNASA is bringing together experts spanning a variety of scientific fields for an unprecedented initiative dedicated to the search for life on planets outside our solar system.  The Nexus for Exoplanet System Science, or “NExSS”, hopes to better understand the various components of an exoplanet, as well as how the planet stars and neighbor planets interact to support life.

Our UA-led team Earths in Other Solar Systems is one of the two largest projects funded in the new program. For more information on our EOS program see the project website http://otherearths.org

Some of the related news coverage:
UA. ASU teams to search for alien life (AZ Daily Star)


Hubble Gets Best View of a Circumstellar Debris Disk Distorted by a Planet

February 19, 2015
STScI Press Release

Beta Pictoris Debris DiskAstronomers have used NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to take the most detailed picture to date of a large, edge-on, gas-and-dust disk encircling the 20-million-year-old star Beta Pictoris.

Check out our Google Hangout session discussing the results!


Got Planets? Smaller Stars Are Best Bet

February 17, 2015

Artist's impression of planets around cool starsIn the search for Earth-size planets elsewhere in the Milky Way, lower-mass stars make for more promising hunting grounds, UA astronomers have discovered.


Extrasolar Storms: How’s The Weather Way Out There?

January 12, 2015

Like galactic storm chasers, UA astronomers are leading an effort to discover how clouds and weather systems change over time on other worlds.


Stormy Stars? NASA’s Spitzer Probes Weather on Brown Dwarfs

January 7, 2014

Swirling, stormy clouds may be ever-present on cool celestial orbs called brown dwarfs. New observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope suggest that most brown dwarfs are roiling with one or more planet-size storms akin to Jupiter’s “Great Red Spot.”


 Scientists Peer Into a Brown Dwarf, Find Stormy Atmosphere

This artist's conception illustrates the brown dwarf named 2MASSJ22282889-431026.Pointing the Spitzer and Hubble space telescopes simultaneously at a brown dwarf, a UA-led team of astronomers has obtained detailed images of the stormy atmosphere that enshrouds these strange objects, which are not quite planets and not quite stars. Their forecast shows planet-sized clouds and showers of sandy and iron rain.


Hubble and Spitzer See Weather Patterns in Brown Dwarf
Astronomers using NASA’s Spitzer and Hubble space telescopes have probed the stormy atmosphere of a brown dwarf, creating the most detailed “weather map” yet for this class of cool, star-like orbs. The forecast shows wind-driven, planet-sized clouds enshrouding these strange worlds.


Exoplanet Caught on the Move
eso1024b
For the first time, astronomers have been able to directly follow the motion of an exoplanet as it moves from one side of its host star to the other. The planet has the smallest orbit so far of all directly imaged exoplanets, lying almost as close to its parent star as Saturn is to the Sun. Scientists believe that it may have formed in a similar way to the giant planets in the Solar System. Because the star is so young, this discovery proves that gas giant planets can form within discs in only a few million years, a short time in cosmic terms.


Cool Stars May Have Different Prebiotic Chemical Mix

This artist's conception shows a young, hypothetical planet around a cool star. A soupy mix of potentially life-forming chemicals can be seen pooling around the base of the jagged rocks.Life on Earth is thought to have arisen from a hot soup of chemicals. Does this same soup exist on planets around other stars? A new study from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope hints that planets around stars cooler than our sun might possess a different mix of potentially life-forming, or “prebiotic,” chemicals.


Disks around Failed Stars – a Question of Age
A team of European astronomers have observed eight Brown Dwarfs, i.e., small and faint objects also known as “failed stars”, with the TIMMI2 infrared sensitive instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on La Silla. From two of these, mid-infrared radiation is detected – for the first time ever from such objects with a ground-based telescope . While the younger Brown Dwarf, aged a few million years, is found to be surrounded by a dusty disk, no warm dust is present around the older ones. The new observations support the following formation hypothesis for Brown Dwarfs: they are born in the same way as “real” stars, by contraction in interstellar clouds of gas and dust . During the later stages of this process, the infalling material is transferred onto the star via a gas and dust disk . This disk – in which planets may possibly form – then disperses with time.

Education and Training in Press:

Scientists from around the world exchange ideas on space exploration at Oro Valley conference

Biology Students Learn to Scan the Stars for Signs of Life
You have to learn to crack eggs if you’re going to cook an omelet. You have to jump in the water if you’re going to learn to swim. And you have to get your hands on telescopes that can search for signs of life beyond Earth if you’re going to study extraterrestrial biology.

Videos / Recorded Lectures:

2012:
Exploring New Worlds (Webcast, STScI)

2015: Hubble Hangout: